A Course in Expository Writing Primary Source Edition

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.

Author: Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris

Publisher: Nabu Press

ISBN: 1295760894

Category:

Page: 308

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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

A Course in Expository Writing

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris

Publisher: Andesite Press

ISBN: 1296590534

Category:

Page: 308

View: 973

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

A Course in Expository Writing

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Gertrude Buck Ph D

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 1342417070

Category:

Page: 314

View: 734

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

A Course in Expository Writing Classic Reprint

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author: Gertrude Buck

Publisher:

ISBN: 1331341825

Category: Self-Help

Page: 314

View: 599

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Excerpt from A Course in Expository Writing The English teacher, more perhaps than any other, is consciously aiming, not to give his students information, but to make them acquire capacity, - capacity, in this case, for expressing their thought to others. But it is only by writing that the student can learn to write well, though much writing may not teach this, and one of the difficulties which an English teacher has to meet is a no less fundamental one than the difficulty of getting his students to write at all - to write, that is, not perfunctorily, but spontaneously, for this is the only kind of writing that counts. This difficulty has its source, at least very largely, in the student's sense of the artificial character of his work. What is the use, he thinks, of writing about the birthplace of Hawthorne, or the character of Lady Macbeth? His teacher knows all about them beforehand, and besides, he isn't writing to his teacher, he isn't writing to anybody, he is just "writing a composition" that is to be corrected for spelling, punctuation, paragraphing; or for its lack of certain qualities, such as "clearness," "precision," and "unity." No wonder he finds it hard to write. We ourselves, when alone, do not usually talk aloud about the things around us, describe the picture before us, or the desk, or the view. We should feel "silly" to be talking to nobody. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

A Course in Expository Writing Scholar s Choice Edition

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Elisabeth Woodbridge Morris

Publisher:

ISBN: 1293985910

Category:

Page: 308

View: 272

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

A Course in Expository Writing

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Elisabeth Woodbridge Gertrude Buck

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN: 0353980234

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 110

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

A Course in Expository Writing

Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Author: Buck Gertrude 1871-1922

Publisher: Hardpress Publishing

ISBN: 1314600524

Category:

Page: 314

View: 370

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Expository Writing in Political Science

Annotate each entry . 1. If not provided , write the names of the courses next to
the course identification and the names of the instructor who taught the course .
This will allow you to remember what courses you took and who taught them to
you ...

Author: Diane E. Schmidt

Publisher: Harpercollins College Division

ISBN: IND:30000039906122

Category: Academic writing

Page: 283

View: 701

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Expository Writing

words of the final sentence of the essay are: "Let it be enough for faith, that the
whole creation groans in mortal frailty, strives with ... Then they followed the strict
chronological order, as if the author were pursuing a course already mapped for
 ...

Author: Mervin James Curl

Publisher: MERVIN JAMES CURL

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 324

View: 422

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Expository Writing It would not be rash to say that more expository thinking is done than any other kind of mental activity. The child who dismantles a clock to find its secret is doing expository thinking; the official, of however complicated a business, who ponders ways and means, is trying to satisfy his business curiosity; the artist who studies the effect of balance, of light and shade, of exclusion or inclusion, is thinking in exposition; politicians are ceaselessly active in explaining to themselves how they may, and to their constituents how they did. We cannot escape Exposition. The question then arises, since this form of writing is always with us how can we make it effective and enjoyable? All writing should be interesting; all really effective writing does interest. It may not be required that every reader be interested in every bit of writing—that would be too much to hope for in a world where sympathies are unfortunately so restricted. To peruse a directory of Bangkok, if one has no possible acquaintance in that city, might become tedious, though one might draw pleasure from the queer names and the suggestions of romance. But if one has a lost friend somewhere in New York, and hopes that the directory will achieve discovery, the bulky and endless volume immediately takes on the greatest interest. Lincoln, driven at length to write a recommendation for a book, to escape the importunities of an agent, wisely, whimsically, wrote, "This is just the right kind of book for any one who desires just this kind of book." Wide though his sympathies were, he recognized that not every one enjoys[Pg 3] everything. The problem of the writer of exposition is to make as wide an appeal as he can. Interest in reading is of two kinds: satisfaction and stimulation. And each of these may be either intellectual or emotional or both. The interest of satisfaction largely arises when the questions which the reader brings with him to his reading are answered. A reader who desires to know what is done with the by-products in a creamery, where the skim milk goes to, will be satisfied—and interested—when he learns the complete list of uses, among them the fact that skim milk is largely made into the white buttons that make our underclothing habitable. The reader who leaves an article about these by-products with the feeling that he has been only half told is sure to be dissatisfied, and therefore uninterested. In the same way, when a reader picks up an article or a book with the desire to be thrilled with romance or wonder, to be taken for the time away from the business of the world, to be wrenched with pity for suffering or with admiration for achievement—in other words, when a reader brings a hungry emotion to his reading—if he finds satisfaction, he is interested.

Expository Writing

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author: Maurice Garland Fulton

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0267003390

Category: Psychology

Page: 606

View: 517

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Excerpt from Expository Writing: Materials for a College Course in Exposition by Analysis and Imitation; Compiled and Edited, With Questions and Exercises According to method and purpose, two kinds Of expository writing may be distinguished, which we may call, for want of more exact designations, scientific exposition, and familiar exposition. In scientific exposition, the writer selects a sub ject within his powers, states it clearly and accurately, gathers material by careful thinking and reading, and develops it into a serious, thorough, and sustained piece Of explanation. The writings of Macaulay, Huxley, Bryce, Tyndall, Mill, Spencer, Newman, are examples of this type Of exposition showing its severity of method and careful accuracy. Familiar exposition, on the other hand, is generally looser in structure and aims to give the personal impressions Of the writer, his whims and fancies, in a manner resembling the easy confidential tone Of conversation. The subjects chosen are usually of a light character, and an original point of View is not infrequently presented. The essays of Charles Lamb, Steele, Addison, Thackeray, and Stevenson are illustrations of this type of exposition. It was this looser type of exposition which first gave vogue to the term essay, but the development of this form of literature has been SO markedly away from a subjective, personal, and leisurely discussion towards an Objec tive, concentrated, and unemotional method, that when we hear the word essay to-day we think rather of the scientific exposition than the familiar. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.